Wilderness Survival Shelters and You

 COCOON SHELTER

These are probably the quickest-to-build wilderness survival shelters around you. It is the closest thing to a natural sleeping bag you will ever see and can be a great way to protect yourself from the cold.

HOW TO BUILD IT:

All you need is debris (leaves, bar, pine needles). Next, pile it two or three feet in height. Also, make sure it’s longer than you are tall. As soon as you burrow into the pile, you should be comfortable enough to sleep. This should also shelter you from the cold.

THE LEANING SHELTER

These wilderness survival shelters are best build next to a rock or a small overhang. These act as a naturally placed wall. Because the natural position of the rock or hill, you are already one-half done with your survival shelter. You only need to support it with branches and limbs that you can easily find in the wilderness.

HOW TO BUILD IT:

All you need is to lean branches on a natural structure. Use leaves to blanket the other side of the ‘wall’ to help shield you from rain or snow. Just cover the leaning limbs with leaves, boughs, pine needles, bark or whatever you find – and you are good to go.

THE FALLEN TREE SHELTER

You can also find something to use as a shelter, like a fallen tree. It is ideally a tree that is not too tall and whose branches are high enough to protect you from snow, rain or wind. This will also camouflage you into the woods so that no animal can spot you.

HOW TO BUILD IT:

If you spot a fallen tree with enough room under it for you to crawl in – you have made it halfway through. All you need to do is to lean a couple of branches against the windward side of the tree. Doing this protects you from the wind. If it is too cold, light up a fire on the open side of the shelter to keep you warm.

LAST THOUGHTS

In the end…

You should know that a shelter will be as comfortable as your bed inside it. Therefore, wilderness survival shelters can’t be complete without a bed. You should make it a little bigger than the space your body covers and at least 6 inches thick. Do this so to be comfortable for the unexpected night out.

Also, never build any wilderness survival shelters on damp ground, on mountain-tops and in open ridges. You should also avoid the bottom of narrow valleys, ravines or washes, where water runs, cold collects and wind goes.

You may find additional information on this topic under the “Survival Extras” tab.

Happy sheltering!